Faculty/Staff Handbook

I. General Information

II. Faculty and Professional Staff Governance

III. UB Academic Policies

IV. UB Personnel Policies

V. SUNY: General Information

Site Index

V. SUNY: General Information
V.A.1. SUNY Board of Trustees - Members
V.A.2. SUNY Board of Trustees - Policies
V.B. Collective Bargaining Units and Contracts
V.C. Statement on Academic Freedom
V.D. Statement of Professional Responsibilities and Rights
V.E. Guidelines for Adjudicating Allegations of Unprofessional Conduct in Violation of the SUNY Statement of Professional Responsibilities and Rights
V.F. State and Fedral Lobbying Disclosure Requirements
V.G. State Regulations Regarding Business and Professional Activities

IV.A.1. SUNY Board of Trustees - Members

State University of New York
2000


Terms of appointment, addresses, and additional information on members of the SUNY Board of Trustees are available on the web pages within the Board's SUNY web site.

SUNY Board of Trustees - Addresses, Terms
SUNY Board of Trustees - Member Profiles

Thomas F. Egan, Chair
Erland E. Kailbourne, Vice Chair
Celine Traylor, Student Representative

Bernard F. Connors
Edward F. Cox
Randy A. Daniels
Candace de Russy
Louis T. Howard
*Pamela R. Jacobs
Nicole Yae Kyoung Kim
Edward S. Nelson
Celine R. Paquette
Paul R. Perez
Nelson A. Rockefeller Jr.
Patricia Elliott Stevens
Harvey F. Wachsman

*University at Buffalo alumnus

Current as of Feb 17, 2000.

V.A.2. SUNY Board of Trustees - Policies

http://www.suny.edu/Board_of_Trustees/PDF/Policies.pdf

Current as of Aug 31, 1997.

V.B. Collective Bargaining Units and Contracts

A number of unions, representing essentially all faculty and staff within the SUNY system, have negotiated formal agreements with the Governor's Office of Employee Relations. Such agreements contain specific articl es related to basic terms and conditions of employment. A number of SUNY or University at Buffalo policies, procedures, and bylaws provide additional guidance.

In addition to employees in specific bargaining units, a number of administrative and managerial staff within SUNY serve in positions that have been designated as Managerial/Confidential by the Public Employees Relations Board. As such, employees serving in those titles are precluded from being represented by any formal bargaining unit.

All of the agreements between the University at Buffalo's unions and the State of New York contain specific procedures under which formal complaints (grievances) and formal discipline are to be handled. If an employee believes his or her rights have been violated, he or she is urged to contact the grievance chair of his or her appropriate bargaining unit so that appropriate steps can be followed.

Employees are assigned to various bargaining units, as indicated below, in accordance with the official state title in which they are serving.

Bargaining units (and their identifying number) are as follows:

United University Professions (UUP 08)
All faculty, librarians, and professional staff
1999 - 2000 UUP Contract

Graduate Student Employees Union (GSEU, CWA 1188)
All Graduate Assistants and Teaching Assistants
GA/TA Contract

Civil Service Employees Association (CSEA 02, 03, 04)
All clerical, maintenance, and a variety of other positions

Council 82 (C 82 01)
All public security officers

Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services Unit (PEF 05)
Some staff in the Student Health Service and other laboratory positions

Security Supervisors Unit, Council 82 (SSU 61)
Supervisors of campus security officers

If you have any questions about which bargaining unit you are in, please ask your supervisor, or call Personnel Services at (716) 645-2646.

Last revised 2/00

V.C. Statement on Academic Freedom

Adopted by the University Faculty Senate April 1986

Faculty of the State University of New York enjoy the same civil liberties, and specifically, freedom of opinion and expression, guaranteed to all citizens by the Constitution. As members of the academic profession, furthermore, those freedoms are translated into the specific forms named below. Just as the medical profession is bound by the Oath of Hippocrates, so is the academic profession bound by the Socratic ideal: to pursue truth without fear or prejudice, and to encourage others to do the same. That pursuit can only be accomplished in a spirit of free inquiry for, as the framers of the Constitution recognized, no law should be made for the human mind.

Recent events on campuses throughout the State of New York have threatened the rights of individuals and groups to free expression, and have challenged the principle that the scholarly and intellectual achievements of professional academics can be judged best only by their peers.

It is, therefore, timely for the Faculty Senate once again to proclaim, support, and recommend the following principles based on the Statement of Professional Rights and Responsibilities as essential to the upholding of those academic freedoms necessary to achieve the objectives of the profession, namely:

1. As scholars, faculty have the right to define the areas of their scholarship in accordance with their professional training, abilities, and interests; and to pursue their studies and share their results subject to no restraints save their own professional integrity and the collective judgment of fellow scholars.

2. As academic professionals, faculty have the right to have their work evaluated solely by fellow scholars who are competent to judge it; and the responsibility, furthermore, to respect the intellectual freedom of their students, while inculcating in them a critical spirit of free inquiry and intellectual integrity.

3. As members of the academic community, faculty have the right to speak freely within the university on all matters affecting their scholarship and teaching without fear of reprisal either overt or covert; and the responsibility to abide by decisions arrived at by the majority, so long as these do not violate their own academic freedoms.

4. In cases where violations or abuses of academic freedom are alleged, faculty have the right to a full, open, and impartial hearing and adjudication by a review body of their peers (as outlined in the Guidelines in the Statement of Professional Rights and Responsibilities or through the contractual review process established by United University Professions and the state, whichever is appropriate).

For further information, contact the Faculty Senate at (716) 645-2003.

Current as of Aug 31, 1997.

V.D. Statement of Professional Responsibilities and Rights

April 1995

The professors of the State University of New York, in order to define their professional responsibilities and rights, make the following statement.

I. Overview

(1) The responsibilities of professors in the State University of New York derive from their membership in a learned profession whose members, within a faculty, perform the dual function of cultivating areas of knowledge as coherently structured intellectual disciplines, and of educating students in these areas. Professorial responsibilities are thus dedicated primarily to this profession, to students, and to colleagues. Obligations to the university and to the society at large are discharged by fulfilling these responsibilities.

(2) The rights of professors in the State University of New York derive, in turn, from membership in the university. In addition, professors retain all the civil rights belonging to citizens in general.

II. Responsibilities

II.A. Scholarship

II.A.(1) As scholars, professors have the responsibility to learn and to advance learning by disciplined inquiry.

II.A.(2) They should pursue studies in the areas of their own scholarship both to keep abreast of the work of fellow scholars and to contribute through individual or collaborative study to the development of knowledge in these areas.

II.A.(3) They should defend scholarly positions that in their judgments are well-founded, and they should modify or abandon positions that in their judgments have been shown to be faulty or untenable.

II.A.(4) They should allow no subsidiary interests to occupy their time and energies to the detriment of their scholarly and faculty roles.

II.A.(5) They should cooperate with fellow scholars within the university and in the profession at large to promote learning in their areas of expertise, and they should help to establish within the university the best conditions for the pursuit of scholarship.

II.B. Teaching Effectiveness and Student Relationships

II.B.(1) As teachers, professors are responsible for educating students in their area of knowledge, seeking in the process not to indoctrinate but to enlighten. As freely and completely as the level of student development permits, professors should share the knowledge they have verified to their own satisfaction with students, and they should nurture understanding of the methods by which the students themselves may in turn become self-disciplined scholars.

II.B.(2) Professors should distinguish fact from opinion and hypothesis from conclusion, and critically present varieties of scholarship.

II.B.(3) They should respect the dignity of students as persons, defend their intellectual freedom and the confidential nature of professional relationships with them, and evaluate their work in a positive effort to enhance their understanding, without regard to considerations other than the quality of the work itself.

II.B.(4) They should be conscientious in meeting students in class and privately at their mutual convenience, and should make themselves available to students in a manner consistent with their other responsibilities.

II.B.(5) They should choose teaching materials and structure their courses in such a way that, in their judgment, will best enable them to facilitate student learning and related teaching responsibilities.

II.C. Collegiality

II.C.(1) As members of a faculty, professors are responsible for promoting effective collegiality.

II.C.(2) They should collectively ensure that administrative structures, rules, and regulations of the university, and of their own institution within it, are consistent with the effective discharge of their scholarly and teaching responsibilities. Furthermore, while they should not violate existing rules, they should be constructively critical of them in an effort both to prevent what in their judgment may hinder their own teaching and scholarship or that of their colleagues, and to improve the conditions in which these activities are carried on. They should study these conditions, participate in decisions respecting them, and counsel administrative officers candidly in the light of their best professional judgment, insofar as that may be done without neglecting their other responsibilities.

II.C.(3) They should abide by the rules and regulations arrived at by their colleagues, even when they disagree, until such time as they may persuade the others differently, so long as that action does not violate the academic freedom of any parties involved.

II.C.(4) They should take deliberate and appropriate action in evaluations of candidates for appointment or reappointment to the faculty of their institution, basing their judgment only on professional grounds.

II.C.(5) They should participate in the governance of the university and their own institution, and in the establishment of procedures determined collectively by the faculty.

II.C.(6) They should conduct themselves in the affairs of their campus, and exercise their rights as scholars and teachers, always with consideration for the welfare of their students, their colleagues, their institution, and the university as a whole.

II.C.(7) When speaking outside the university on any matter, professors should avoid creating the impression that they speak for the university or their institution within it, except when they are acting as duly appointed agents in that capacity.

III. Rights

III.A. Scholarship

III.A.(1) As scholars, professors have the right to define the areas of their scholarship, in accordance with their professional training, abilities, and interests; and to pursue their studies and share their results subject to no restraints save their own professional integrity and the collective judgment of their work by fellow scholars. Because only scholarly peers are competent to evaluate such work, professors have the right to have their intellectual work judged exclusively by such persons.

III.A.(2) Professors have the right both to determine the minimal and to promote the optimal conditions within the university for the discharge of their scholarly responsibilities.

III.B. Teaching Effectiveness and Student Relationships

III.B.(1) As teachers, professors have the rights and freedom to present the results of their studies to students, irrespective of who may be offended by such ideas or knowledge.

III.B.(2) Professors have the further right to determine the conditions necessary for the effective exercise of this right, including, among others, the selection of instructional materials, the prerequisites, and the number of students that can be taught effectively in each classroom situation. They also have the right to determine the style in which teaching can best be done, provided always that this right is exercised in such a way as not to neglect their responsibilities as scholar, teacher, and colleague.

III.B.(3) Professors have the collective right to establish and enforce criteria for the attainment of academic degrees within their respective disciplines, within the context of relevant education law or regulations.

III.C. Collegiality

III.C.(1) As members of the faculty, professors have the right to speak freely within the university on all matters ultimately affecting their scholarship and teaching; they have the right to participate in discussions with colleagues and students on such matters without fear of overt or covert reprisal, and to be accorded the dignity of a responsive hearing when they offer counsel.

III.C.(2) They have the collective right to evaluate candidates for appointment or reappointment to institutional positions on their respective campuses, and thereby to define the membership of the profession within the university.

III.C.(3) They have the right to be judged in the discharge of all their responsibilities by the fellow members of their profession.

Current as of April,1995.

V.E. Guidelines for Adjudicating Allegations of Unprofessional Conduct in Violation of the SUNY Statement of Professional Responsibilities and Rights

In order to provide a means for professional self-regulation and to assure procedural due process in proceedings involving charges of unprofessional conduct in violation of the SUNY Statement of Professional Responsibilities and Rights, a procedure should be established on each SUNY campus to provide collegial consideration of such allegations. Such procedure should encompass the following:

1. Judgments of unprofessional behavior should emanate from professional peers.

2. Adherence to the basic concepts of procedural fairness should be required, including the following provisions:

2.a. Allegations should be documented.

2.b. The burden of proof should rest with the complainant.

2.c. The respondent should have full access to all allegations and documentation, and ample opportunity to respond.

2.d. Appropriate and reasonable professional behavior and confidentiality should be maintained in the proceedings.

2.e. Provision for appeal should be afforded.

3. The review or hearing body should be empowered to resolve the complaint or grievance informally, through reasonable conciliation, prior to instituting more formal proceedings.

4. Several levels of appropriate action (including reprimand and censure), insofar as may be consistent with contractual agreements in force at the time of review, should be provided to the review body.

It is understood that, at any given time, there may be in force contractual agreements concerning terms and conditions of employment of members of the professional staff of the State University of New York. No item in this Statement of Professional Responsibilities and Rights should be construed as violating or abrogating such agreements. The statement is intended, rather, to assert that, as participants in a professional collegiality, professors in the State University of New York undertake the responsibilities and enjoy the rights set forth herein, quite apart from such contractual agreements made by them and on their behalf as persons employed by the university.

Current as of Oct, 2000.

V.F. State and Federal Lobbying Disclosure Requirements

New York State Lobbying Act

Legislation enacting a new Lobbying Act was signed by Governor Pataki on December 30, 1999 and took effect January 1, 2000. This new act requires the University at Buffalo to register and report the New York Temporary State Commission on Lobbying. The State Lobbying Act requires pubic disclosure of the identities, activities and expenditures of those seeking to influence legislation, rules and regulations of New York State and local government.

Registration

The University at Buffalo is required to list as part of its lobbying registration each individual who lobbies on behalf of UB and who anticipates expending more than $2,000 of combined reportable compensation and expenses for lobbying activities according to the following definition:

Lobbying or Lobbying Activities- (I) any attempt to influence the passage or defeat of any legislation by either house of the state legislature or the approval or disapproval of any legislation by the Governor, or the adoption or rejection of any rule or regulation having the force and effect of law or the outcome of any rate making proceeding by a state agency, or (II) any attempt to influence the passage or defeat of any local law, ordinance or regulation by any rule or regulation having the force and effect of a local law, ordinance or regulation or any rate making proceeding by any municipality.

Reporting

The State Lobby Act requires a bi-monthly written report containing information relating to the issue and government entity lobbied, as well as a detailed account of all lobbying expenses.

Gifts

Gifts (including meals and entertainment) to any public official of greater than $75 are strictly prohibited. The law mandates each recipient of a gift be notified in advance of its value and the Commission strongly recommends keeping written records of such notification.

Penalties

The penalties for violating the Lobby Act are quite severe; a Class A Misdemeanor for first offenses and a Class E Felony for subsequent offenses in addition to substantial civil penalties and fines.

For questions or concerns on these requirements, please contact Janet Penksa, Associate Vice President for University Services, at 645-7730.

Federal Lobbying Disclosure Act

The Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995, Public Law 104-65 requires organizations, including colleges and universities, that have one or more employees who are lobbyists, to file semi-annual reports to the Congress about its lobbying activities and expenditures. Now that the University at Buffalo has established an Office of Federal Relations, it must register and report.

The purpose of this memorandum is to remind you of the existence of the federal law governing lobbying and the reporting requirements that may apply to persons within your units.

Registration

Each individual whose work falls under the following definitions must register with the Clerk of the House of Representatives and the Secretary of the Senate.

Lobbyist - an individual employed and compensated by a client (in this case, the University) to perform services that include more than one lobbying contact in any six-month period. To be covered an employee must spend 20% or more of his/her time in a six-month period engaging in lobbying activities.

Lobbying Contact "Lobbying contact" means any oral or written communication to members of Congress, Congressional staff, or federal agency officials on behalf of the institution. A lobbying contact includes not only direct contacts with federal officials, but also includes background research and planning activities intended expressly as preparation for a lobbying contact.

Examples of lobbying contacts include:
letters, faxes, e-mail messages and telephone calls, meetings with officials or staff

Lobbying Activities include the formulation, modification, or adoption of federal legislation; the formulation, modification, or adoption of a federal rule, regulation, executive order, or other federal program, policy, or position; or the administration of federal program or policy.

The law contains exemptions for media contacts, speeches, status requests, testimony and responses to requests of government officials.

Reporting

The Lobbying Disclosure Act requires each registrant to file a semiannual report. The first report covers the period from January 1 to June 30. The second report covers from July1 to December 31. The reports require a good faith estimate of the total expenses for all lobbying activities, including those of employees who do not meet the statutory definition of a lobbyist.

The next semi-annual report (covering the period from January 1, 2000 to June 30, 2000) must be filed no later than July 15th, 2000. In order for us to provide a good faith estimate of our lobbying activities and expenditures to the Congress, we are asking each individual at UB with any "lobbying contact" with the federal government, as defined above, to complete the attached form. We are providing this form well before the due date so that you may begin to collect the required information.

This form should be completed by July 9, 2000 and returned to Michael Pietkiewicz, Director of Federal Relations by electronic mail (mjp24@buffalo.edu) or fax (716-645-2933).

Gifts

Gifts (including meals and entertainment) to any federal official of greater than $50 are strictly prohibited. In addition gifts to any single federal official cannot exceed a total of $100 in any calendar year.

Penalties

Whoever knowingly fails to comply with provisions of the Lobbying Disclosure Act may be subject to a civil fine of up to $50,000.

For questions or concerns on these requirements, please contact Janet Penksa, Associate Vice President for University Services, at 645-7730.

Lobbying Activities Report Form

Lobbying Activities Report Form

Current as of March, 2000.

V.G. State Regulations Regarding Business and Professional Activities

[Public Officers Law: Sections 73, 74 and 78]

The ethics provisions of the Public Officers Law are contained in three sections: Public Officers Law Section 73 prohibits or restricts certain business and professional activities and relationships both during and after employment; Section 73-a requires financial disclosure of certain state officers and employees; and Section 74 recites the State Code of Ethics. By law, state officers who are unpaid or per diem members of boards, commissions, or councils are not subject to Section 73, but if named as pol icy makers, they must file financial disclosure statements under Section 73 (3) (b), which prohibits covered individuals from receiving compensation or rendering services against the interest of the state with respect to any case before the Court of Claim s.

Contingent Retainers [Public Officers Law: Section 73 (2)]

State officers and employees may not enter into fee arrangements for services rendered contingent upon agency action on any case, proceeding, application, or decision. However, nothing prohibits the setting of a fee based on the reasonable value of the se rvices rendered.

Court of Claims Appearances [Public Officers Law: Section 73 (3)]

State officers and employees may not receive compensation or render services against the interest of the state with respect to any case before the Court of Claims

No-Bid Contracts [Public Officers Law: Section 73 (4) ]

State officers and employees individually, or firms of which they are members, or corporations in which a state officer or employee owns or controls 10 percent or more of the stock, may not enter into a contract for the sale of goods and services with any state agency for more than $25 or with any private entity where the power to enter into a contract is exercised by a state agency, unless a contract is awarded after public notice and competitive bidding. For this section only, "services" shall not inclu de employment as an employee.

Gifts [Public Officers Law: Section 73 (5)]

State officers and employees may not accept or solicit any gifts valued at $75 or more, in any form (includes money, service, travel, entertainment, or hospitality), under circumstances in which it could be inferred that the gift was intended to influence or reward the recipient for performing official duties, or was offered in anticipation of some official action. Gifts under $75 may also be suspect, under Public Officers Law Section 74, if they were intended to influence or reward the recipient. The law also prohibits anyone from offering or giving such a gift to a statewide elected official or state officer or employee or legislative employee under such circumstances.

Prohibited Appearance [Public Officers Law: Section 73 (7)]

State officers and employees may not (other than in the proper discharge of official duties) receive, directly or indirectly, or enter into any agreement for compensation for the appearance or rendition of services by himself or another in relation to any case, proceeding, application, or other matter before a state agency in connection with:

 the purchase, sale, rental, or lease of real property, goods, or services, or a contract there for, from, to, or with any such agency;

 any proceeding relating to rate-making;

 the adoption or repeal of any rule or regulation having the force and effect of law;

 the obtaining of grants of money or loans;

 licensing; or

 any proceeding relating to a franchise provided for in the public-service law.

 Nothing in this subdivision shall prohibit a state officer or employee from appearing before a state agency in a representative capacity:

 in connection with a ministerial matter, unless otherwise prohibited; or

 on behalf of an employee organization in any matter where the appearance is duly authorized by the employee organization.

Post-Employment Restrictions [Public Officers Law Section 73 (8)]

The purpose of the law is to prohibit former state officers and employees from exercising undue influence over former colleagues, from receiving special treatment or creating the impression that they can receive special treatment to benefit themselves or private clients. The post-employment restrictions of the law are intended to prevent the unfair advantage that former state officers or employees may have, based on either their personal contacts in state agencies or their particular knowledge.

Two-Year Bar

No state officer or employee may, within a period of two years from the date of termination from state service, appear or practice before his or her former agency or receive compensation for any services rendered on behalf of any person, firm, corporation , or association in relation to any case, proceeding, application, or other matter before the former agency.

Lifetime Bar

No former state officer or employee may ever appear, practice, communicate, or otherwise render services before any state agency or receive compensation for such services on behalf of any person, firm, corporation, or other entity in relation to any case, proceeding, application, or transaction with respect to which the former officer or employee was directly concerned and personally participated while in public service, or which was under his or her active consideration.

Net Revenues [Public Officers Law: Section 73 (10)]

A firm, association, or corporation of which a state officer or employee is a member may appear, practice, communicate, or otherwise render services in relation to any matter before or transact any business with a state agency, so long as:

 the state officer or employee does not share in the net revenues, as defined in accordance with GAAP; or

 while acting in good faith, the state officer or employee reasonably believed that he/she would not share in the net revenues.

Oral Communication [Public Officers Law: Section 73 (12)]

A statewide elected official, state officer or employee, or political party chair who is a member, associate, retired member, or counsel to or shareholder in any firm, association, or corporation that is appearing or rendering services in connection with any case, proceeding, application, or other matter listed in Public Officers Law Section 73 (7) (a) or (b) shall not orally communicate, with or without compensation, as to the merits of such cause with an officer or an employee of the agency concerned with the matter.

Financial Disclosure [Public Officers Law: Section 73-a]

The underlying premise of financial disclosure is that the primary conflicts of interest that can be regulated are economic in nature and arise from circumstances in which public officials can benefit at the public's expense. By requiring information about such items as an individual's assets, liabilities, and outside employment, the public can better determine when conflicts of interest might occur.

Annual statements of financial disclosure are required for all policy makers and from those who-unless exempted by the New York State Ethics Commission-earn compensation in excess of the job rate for SG-24 as listed in Section 130 (1) of Civil Service Law (currently $58,198.00 for fiscal year 199798, subject to change). In 1991, more than 16,500 individuals filed, including the four statewide elected officials (Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, and Comptroller), the state chairs of politic al parties, and certain county chairs of political parties. The annual statement must contain the information requested and be in the form outlined in section 73-a (3).

The value of assets and liabilities is indicated by categories of value designated by letters A through F: For example, the category "A" indicates a value less than $5,000; "F" indicates a value of $250,000 or more. By law, the commission does not reveal these letter values when it makes the forms available for public inspection.

Interested individuals may view the forms at the commission's office in Albany. When possible, the commission makes the forms available for inspection at other locations. Commission regulations do not allow photocopies of the forms to be made; individuals who inspect the forms may take handwritten notes.

The commission allows state employees who serve in the research scientist series of titles, and academic employees of the City University of New York and the State University of New York, to complete a short form. Faculty members must complete an addition al form when they apply for research grants.

Commission staff review each form for completeness and audit the forms for indications of conflicts of interest.

Any individual required to file an annual statement under this section who knowingly and willfully fails to file, or files a false statement with the intent to deceive, may be subject to civil and/or criminal penalties.

The Code of Ethics [Public Officers Law: Section 74]

While many private companies and professional associations have their own codes of ethics, there is a major difference between their codes and the state's codes; i.e., the state code also is the law. On the other hand, it has one thing in common with many other codes of ethics: It is a list of things you shouldn't do. The following is a summary of its provisions.

You are prohibited from engaging in any activity that is in substantial conflict with the proper discharge of your duties in the public interest, accepting other employment that would impair your judgment in the exercise of your official duties, and disclosing confidential information that you gain from your state position.

You cannot use your official position to secure unwarranted privileges for yourself or others. If you have a financial interest in a business entity, you should not engage in any transaction between the state and that entity that might be in conflict with the proper discharge of your official duties. You also must avoid making personal investments in enterprises that you might reasonably believe may be directly involved in decisions you make or that might create a conflict of interest between your public duty and private interest.

You cannot, by your conduct, leave the impression that anyone can influence you based on their family relationship, rank, position, or influence. Nor should you act in a way that raises suspicion among the public that you are likely to be engaged in acts that are in violation of your public trust.

If you are a full-time employee, neither you nor any firm or association of which you are a member-or any corporation you own or control, directly or indirectly-can sell goods or services to any person, firm, or association that either is licensed or has its rates set by the state agency in which you are employed.

If you have a financial interest valued at $10,000 or more in any activity subject to the jurisdiction of a regulatory agency, you should file a written statement with the Secretary of State disclosing this interest.

Anyone who knowingly or intentionally violates any provision of this section may be fined, suspended, or removed from employment, in addition to any penalty contained in any other provision of law.

Certification [Public Officers Law: Section 78]

Within ten days after commencing performance of official duties, state officers shall file with the Secretary of State a statement acknowledging receipt of a copy of Sections 73 through 78 of the Public Officers Law, and that they have read and will conform to the provisions thereof and to the norms of conduct for officers and employees of state agencies.

Current as of Aug 31, 1997.